Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Sociopath quote: concerned face

From television show "Dead Like Me"

George: Do you really care how it's going with me?
Rube: Sure, I make my face look like this and the concerned words come out.

121 comments:

  1. So true. I don't think it's exclusive to sociopaths though. But I think they do it to the extreme and use it as way to act so concerned for the other person and take advantage of the situation to build trust and the image of really caring. They use it as a catalyst


    Grace

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  2. ...and people at the other end of the spectrum have to work hard to keep their empathy from being too obvious from not knowing how that would be construed. Resulting in their being chronically regarded as socially inept, maladjusted or "wooden".

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  3. I agree with Grace, pretending to care about someone as means for a desired outcome is not exclusive to sociopathy. In fact, that's more human than sociopathic. What happens is the human will allow the caring of the objective to intertwine with the caring of the individual and complicate themselves and the individual.

    Then one day they wake up and realize a. the bullshit has stopped and they begin to care, but for real this time. b. the truth: that they never cared to begin with and were just fooling themselves, but due to the nature of not having any clue what they want or need they decide they might as well take what's convenient. This is one of the finest of all processes because it allows them to ignore their mistake(s) and re-create themselves. It's also something they keep to themselves indefinitely :)

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  4. Well said anon. But I have my doubts whether such internal conflicts can be kept from surfacing in other ways.

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  5. The words internal conflict suggest that each human is different and will arrive at a different destination of internal (insert state of mind here). If they were so different I would not have been able to say what I said an hour ago...

    YOU might be different though.

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  6. notme said...
    chin up empath. it takes all sorts to make a world.

    :)

    ---

    Notme, I left a portion of this on the previous thread but decided to add more and take it here.

    ----
    Thank you, notme. I'm quite resilient, trust me. It just is that I need to retreat and regroup when I sense people are attacking. It's because I don't want to attack back viciously. Somehow I always thought rage is below me, but that led to an intellectual bully. On one side child-like clinging to what's right on the other strength in intellectual bullying when one does me wrong.

    I hear 'lighten up,' often. Cannot internalize that somehow but once I am convinced people are actually taking it easy I relax too. After I left yesterday, the exchange among yourselves was definitely like that, quite playful. I liked that.

    I never flapped my hands but I always had some repetitive thing. First it was nail-biting, then pushing a finger onto another. I still have both occasionally. When I read books, when I am in different situations. Can't tell what triggers but possibly when I don't have a full-understanding of the situation, when I am learning something new.

    I am extremely sensitive to negative feedback. In two important cases I actually did go into rage. In the first mom was demanding that I lie to people about something ridiculous because she did not feel comfortable with it. It had nothing to do with her, had to do with my life and I just was not gonna lie. All I can tell you is that she must have been scared to death. I stopped talking to her too. Then she came back a few months later with apologies and since then I have kept much more privacy from her. The second rage also was when I thought my boss was lying to me, again about a matter that involved me. Oh, boy. He also must have been scared. The thing is it turned out to be true, except he should not have conveyed the message in that format, plus I had already judged him to be a socio based on things he used to tell me about other people.

    Why am I telling you these? Well, I believe these really are not serving my interests that well. Or, maybe I want to hear I need to give more feedback, very quickly, not in rage but in a healthy dose of anger. There really are two controls. One, don't be so sensitive. Two, tell that you are. Which is when, and in what does and what effort. That is the big question.

    How are you handling your high sensitivity?
    --------
    I went to highlysensitivepeople.com. That list applies to me in so many ways, and my entire family. Maybe the list that we checked in the Asperger implications are simply result of HSP characteristics, not sure. And, not important. I suffer from both lists.

    The discussions above on this thread learning to care when you don't, is quite different than learning to not care when you do and feel shouldn't. I'm trying to figure out some commonalities though. Thank you for bringing up HSP. Have you ever read a good book on how to deal with it? I think that would be a good starting point for me.

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  7. notme.. left a note on the previous thread, but want to add more here.

    I read about HSP. The list at http://www.highlysensitivepeople.com/
    totally applies.

    So, the results we checked at the Asperger list could be the results of HSp too, right? The bottomline is the results are there. Were you given a good book on how to deal with HSP?

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  8. My mind was lazy. Actually it should be "compromise", as in a sense of having to live as a compromised state. I didn't know how to delete my previuous post.

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  9. Are you Gag coming back to correct yourself? If not, you seem to be overwhelmingly confused as opposed to lazy.

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  10. shove it puppy. hehe

    you know who are full of shit? scroll now...
























    constipated folks. Like you!

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  11. Let's not split hairs here. It was the SQOTD because of the sociopathic tendency to do just that, all the time. Of course you cute little empaths can do that, but I'd like to see you struggle and strain to pull it off when you just got news that someone very close to you has just died.


    Dead Like Me was painful to watch.

    I liked some of the characters. I liked their shenanigans. I even thought the concept was interesting. But throw them all together, and it was a hit or miss jumble. When an episode was miss, I just wanted to skip it, but stuck with it so I wouldn't miss anything.

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  12. notable... check this out. in four years I lost 10 friends, all natural causes/accidents, all independent. then there was calm. then two people drowned before my eyes. then calm again. then one guy shot execution style. then another filled with bullets inthe chest and i had to identify. you wanna talk about death?

    and, who was that thinking I was sheltered?

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  13. Empath, are you missing empathy? Shot execution style and "calm". Wow!

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  14. calm comes after a while because I want it. (I'm sparing some adjectives here on you because of your sqotd, no need to insult slow graspers)

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  15. My response was for the straightforward statement by the anon@ 24, 2010 5:29 AM to which I thought I understood but to which he obviously thought different. Why such a big deal anon?

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  16. No I am saying there were two different anons, and the later did not make any sense. Thought you forgot to log in, or something. Otherwise they were on the wrong thread.

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  17. calm comes after a while because I want it.

    Explain.

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  18. ok, I'll explain, but then you explain why you could ask me that question because to me the answer is obvious. Why wasn't it obvious to you?

    I'm a highly sensitive empath, very high IQ, and very successful life story. So, not only in need of but also able to create a pretty sheltered/controlled life style. Then comes deaths. Like notable was saying. Death, particularly observing the pain of a mother after death is very painful for an empath. The waters are no more calm. You either can't get to the calm (and commit suicide since you are not the type who would kill someone else) or you get to the calm. The first case is hard, but a close second and a close third create hell. It's like you're in Vietnam and your fellow soldiers are leaving one by one. Empath's hell on earth. After the 10th you're broken and accepting. Shot, ok. drowned, ok. Release the burden to God.

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  19. no one's SQOTD answered! ;-)

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  20. I was thinking... Had this been Vietnam, after the third I sure would've started some major killing of the other side, in very vicious ways, and after return home I could never recover from the post-trauma since I'd be seeing myself as a monster given that I am an empath not a sociopath. Maybe they should screen for sociopaths before sending out to war.

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  21. People are typically quiet when death in all seriousness is the topic. So that the list is complete, I also had two empath friends who killed themselves. The girl took the pills, the guy hung to the three under which he used to meditate.

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  22. Be honest with me, empath, are you making all of this up?

    I'm having trouble relating in any way to what you just described (no offense intended). Your description is perplexing.

    Also, I might have missed it but were/are you in the military, which might explain all of these sequential deaths?

    Otherwise, I'm going to have to blame the demons again.

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  23. Ok, everybody, please excuse my language...

    You really have issues, buddy. With this attitude you learn shit in life. Read again and understand. And, fucking believe your ears for a change. What demons. You and everyone around you will die one day. Do you know statistics? You can work on the probability of having someone like me on earth.

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  24. @empath; Your Vietnam analogy? seems rather masculine in a Hollywood way. Strange though this kind of post-trauma is not a granted for some. See the link I posted about the Coconut Revolution

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  25. Masculine in a Hollywood way? You mean, I could write a thriller men could enjoy?

    I don't follow 'this kind of post-trauma is not a granted for some.'

    How do I find links here (I still am learning my way around here).

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  26. What I'd like to know is what a self-proclaimed "Highly Sensitive Person" is doing on a blog about sociopathy.

    I can't be bothered to look through all the comments if you've mentioned this already somewhere.

    Are you in fact suffering from PTSD?

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  27. Pardon me, it was a Link that I posted in another topic. Anyhow, there's a bit in this doco concerning observations of post conflict attitudes if my recollection serves me right.

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  28. Just as you can't be bothered, I can't be bothered repeating myself, puppy. You really make me miss notme. Where she's right on, you're dense and rude. I'd take dense, but when the rude comes with it, I'll dismiss and insult back.

    I don't see any PTSD in me, but definitely made some tough choices. Such as no children. Losing a child would be something I could not possibly be able to deal with. That's control and shelter right there. But, I really enjoyed other peoples' kids for as long as they remained alive, lol.

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  29. Pardon me, it was a link I posted in another topic. Anyhow, there's a bit in this doco about observations of post conflict attitudes if my recollection serves me right.

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  30. I don't see why you're inferring that I'm insulting you. In fact I find you intriguing, so please continue.

    Perhaps it'll help me decide whether you're highly delusional or simply an inexperienced troll.

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  31. Pardon me, it was a link I posted in another topic. Anyhow, there's a bit in this doco about observations of post conflict attitudes if my recollection serves me right.

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  32. no one, I'll only answer to a question coming from you if in my mind it may help other people to see someone else's truth. Since in my mind I'm so committed to truth anyone who keeps questioning te truth of what I'm saying appears to me as insulting. And, the way you're doing it is not appearing to be with an intent to understand but an effort to falsify, and that's what I am reacting to. Improve on your 'pausing a question' skills and I'll improve on my not to take things personally, alright?

    As for your last two sentences.. Whichever way one looks at them, they are insulting. And, you would not need to talk like that after an insult, you'd talk like that toward anyone as the very first sentence of your interaction. Hence, I see you inherently rude.

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  33. Thank you Gag, I'll read that.

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  34. A defensive attitude is equally conducive to ignorance, dear empath.

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  35. wow, wednesday sure is time-killing day.

    Empath, i'm highly unreliable, but thanks for your faith in me anyway.

    yes, i read Elaine Aron's book on HSPs. it was illuminating. very nice stuff.

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  36. no one... Unbelievable. I really mean it. Of all the people on earth, the word I needed to motivate me to not want to attack an insulting bully is that. Even the slightest possibility of appearing ignorant is a huge no no in my book. Oh, goodness. OK, I forgive you. And, I really really love you for this. I'm sure you think I'm being sarcastic given that you are no one, but notme will totally believe and understand where I'm coming from. I'm literal. I need words as motivations.

    Notme, please read all of today. It sure has been interesting to chat here without you.

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  37. by without you I meant, without the feeling of being understood. ALthough Gag gave me some of that.

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  38. I sense that ME is suffering from some sort of distraction lately. His last few posts or so seem like they were written by someone else. Hope all is well.

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  39. empath, why are you so reactive?

    i have met several "highly sensitive" people and they were always too busy self-empathizing to pay much attention to what was going on around them.

    you seem intelligent but are quick to pick a fight. why are you here?

    empath said...
    notable... check this out. in four years I lost 10 friends, all natural causes/accidents, all independent. then there was calm. then two people drowned before my eyes. then calm again. then one guy shot execution style. then another filled with bullets inthe chest and i had to identify. you wanna talk about death?

    and, who was that thinking I was sheltered?


    the gentleman doth protest too much, or are you bragging? your comment makes me wonder if the deaths affected you at all deeply or only deeply inconvenienced you. you don't write from the heart, empath.

    do you have flashbacks that break the calm? what do you feel when you remember the people who died, the way they died, the way they looked before and after?

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  40. aspie said...
    I sense that ME is suffering from some sort of distraction lately. His last few posts or so seem like they were written by someone else. Hope all is well.


    me too

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  41. Amazingly the first feeling that comes is guilt, why not me but my friend. Which is ridiculous, given I was not even anywhere near the accident(s). Definitely was the same for the first ten which were all accidents or sicknesses. In addition to guilt, deep sorrow and missing, even death wishes upon yourself as if I don't want this sort of pain in me anymore, I can't take it..

    Remembering all the wonderful things about the person and thinking life is so unfair, God is so bad.

    The one I saw with the bullet holes in his chest was almost envy that I wish I were him. His face was calm, content, looking up. He could have been me, I only got there ten minutes after before he did and parked only two cars away from him.

    After so many though, I started to get this weird sense that maybe God is protecting me. At least, believing that is in my best interest, otherwise pretty darn scary to live with the level of death awareness I have.

    OK, why do you all keep asking me why I'm here? I mean, ok some my friends of mine died, but I don't think you are my friends, yet. So, relax, you won't die anytime soon.

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  42. empath said...
    Even the slightest possibility of appearing ignorant is a huge no no in my book.


    not in mine. people love to feel superior. it's the fastest way to draw someone out, and get a peek at their true nature. it puts people at ease, and makes them feel or think they can teach you something or take advantage (in which case the advantage is mine). mostly i like the freedom.

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  43. After so many though, I started to get this weird sense that maybe God is protecting me.

    And the magical thinking comes out. Sigh.

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  44. OK, I have a question. The first ten died between my 16 and 20. And, I started to pray(I guess when I turned 18) that I lived to 25 every night. I mean, nobody was charging me for how many more years I wished, why the heck I was trying to negotiate till 25 with God? Any ideas? It really beats me.

    At 42 I met a 93 year old who looked really darn happy and that helped me to finally get out of this feeling of how come I lived all this extra and move unto shit, I wanna live to 100.

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  45. Gag: We have always been at war with Eurasia.

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  46. the whole gamut of human behavior is here today. it really is exhilarating.

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  47. "I met a 93 year old who looked really darn happy".

    I could, yet can't imagine this :-(

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  48. I once asked my 94 year old friend if she'd like me to get her some audio books since she could not see well anymore. She said 'dear, I cannot put one more activity unto my schedule. When you're my age everything takes so long, and you're calmly busy all the time.'

    How sweet is that? Then we walked to the hospital to visit her 73 year old daughter who was in much worse condition health-wise.

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  49. Cryptic references don't you think, especially with the latest incident in Korea?

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  50. I wouldn't worry too much about Korea. The U.S. has been feeding them money behind the curtain of sanctions since inception. They pretty much bought and payed for NK's nuclear program which they claim to shun, or disagree with, or however they will pretend to react in the future. That trick isn't new or unique either.

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  51. You mean the baiting the weak to challenge the strong trick?

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  52. I think Paul Erkman once said if a person changes their facial expression to match an emotion, then they experience that emotion.

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  53. Yes, to some degree. Although it's Ekman, not Erkman.

    Basically, the brain "checks in" with your face while forming emotional responses. If you're smiling, the brain thinks "Oh, happy. Okay." And so on.

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  54. are good actors really actors then?

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  55. Ack, typo...

    If memory serves the current "method" movie actors are encouraged/taught to utilise is to remember situations they were in where they felt the desired emotion, so that they then feel that emotion. This is also why actors often end up depressed, suicidal and with all sorts of issues: They have to relive past trauma in every traumatic scene.

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  56. to empath

    i just read your long post and i can certainly relate. i never re-wrote my comment to you from sunday which failed to post, but in it i explained that i am the emotional type, very intense, and aggression is one way it comes out. people find it engaging/off-putting. my mother always says to me 'you are so intense!' and i think to myself, why is that a bad thing? lol.

    i end up cutting people out of my life quite a bit, but i cool off, and ofen live to regret letting them back in. but we are in a good position to try to understand others non-judgementally, so we need to use that to our advantage, so that we stop getting so offended by everything that people do.

    anyway, as far as controlling your sensitivity, and knowing how to address people in confrontational situations, i'm just me:

    i can straight up lash out verbally. i called my supervisor a 'fucking cow!' cos she deducted my day's pay for wasting time. i was having a VERY bad day, heartbreak and all, and she was the final straw. lol. next day, i'd cooled down and phoned her up to apologise, no excuses. i was not proud of my outburst in that case. lol. (she was made of rock, so she was unfazed).

    i live in a sort of bubble, and every so often someone says or does something that wakes me up to a harsh, antagonistic world, and it takes me a while to adjust, then i state my piece, very very firmly, as if to say, don't mess with me, i'm not a pushover despite my childlike, innocent demeanor.

    people do back off, i don't know why. i can't imagine i am threatening at all. maybe they just think i'm too unpredictable or combustible to trifle with. once again, i don't know.

    the only person who never backed off was a narcissist i met, but we both enjoyed the endless baiting enough so it was fine.

    all i can say is, don't attack the person, attack the argument, obviously as calmly as you can. if you see that they are wilfully irrational, by all means, insult them to the hilt, if that's what you are getting from them. it will feel very beneath you, but if you're angry at their treatment of you, your only options are to fight fire with fire, or to get away from them.

    'How are you handling your high sensitivity?'

    i drink, heavily.~
    i channel it, somehow. we aren't great at compartmentalising, so getting close to that is good enough.
    you can't fight your sensitivity. you have to work with it. form your life around it, not the other way around. the people in my life, my job etc. are all factors in how well i cope with it. one main tip is: 'Don't take things personally.' if you can do that, happy days.

    'The discussions above on this thread learning to care when you don't, is quite different than learning to not care when you do and feel shouldn't.'

    yes, we have the opposite concern.

    there's a lot on the net about sensitivity. like i said to TNP yesterday, i hate giving advice. i live in my head too much.
    and not all sensitive types are the same, some are high sensation seekers, some are more introverted. i'm the first type, which means i can get myself into a lot of trouble in life. lol.

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  57. seriously, this is the second time this week a long comment has not posted.


    empath, again, it was to you and it dissappeard.

    god.

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  58. No Gag, manipulation.

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  59. This is also why actors often end up depressed, suicidal and with all sorts of issues: They have to relive past trauma in every traumatic scene.

    our dear empath seems to have sufficient experience already.

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  60. You're not describing anything special, empath. Emotional numbness is common, from trauma and or professional situations where it is formed.

    The sociopath, however, is not going to need the "calming" stage. You see someone dead and you think, "Glad I'm not them," or, "Sucks to be you."

    I'm inclined to agree with 'no one'. Your way of describing it was peculiar for a so-called HSP.

    You transformed from someone that seemed like they'd never been out of their parent's basement to a trauma 'victim'.

    I'm not exactly calling bullshit, but you seem rather suspect. I keep getting images of a kid eating gogurt and making up stories on the interwebz. Keep it up, sport.~

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  61. empath said..
    OK, why do you all keep asking me why I'm here? I mean, ok some my friends of mine died, but I don't think you are my friends, yet. So, relax, you won't die anytime soon.


    skirting the question... nice try.

    as far as the reaction to your friends' deaths, i would have expected anger not guilt. why the guilt? do you feel responsible in some way for their deaths?

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  62. i think ptsd: that would be my guess, with a dose of survivor's guilt possibly. numbing goes along with all of that.

    -armchair diagnostician

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  63. anom@ 24, 2010 2:05 PM

    care to explain the mechanics and end goal?

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  64. notme & empath.
    Thanks for sharing,...survival techniques?

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  65. I couldn't read all of the comments cause I'm tired. But I was reading some of Empath's comments and you are very expressive but I don't know what you're expressing exactly. It seems like your expressions are from a very busy mind. Your expreinces with death sound sad but anxious or angry at the same time so I'm trying to relate. I have seen death too. And my way of expressing that is to say...I'm forever changed and I've gained a sense of maturity along with it but I could have done without it just the same. I'll go back a read more after a cup of coffee..strong coffee:)

    Grace

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  66. Hmmmm...To Coffee or Not To Coffee...That is the question.

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  67. If I started drinking Rum right now, I'd disappoint a table full of food and several family members tomorrow.

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  68. Have a rum drink then a cup of coffee:)

    Grace

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  69. Eh- The pirates will have to give me a rain check. I'm wussing-out with hot cocoa.

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  70. i've got my cigarettes.

    i'd like a cigar right now. only cos i've never had one.

    i'll see what i can do about that one tomorrow.

    i'm oh so orally fixated.

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  71. notme... Thank you for writing.

    To some of the other remarks: What anyone says is only as meaningful as what others understand from it. Sooner or later (if not already and I certainly hope later) you will get a first hand sense of how you react in the face of loss.

    Survival techniques, you asked, Gag. I only trust that time universally heals. People come up with their own little rituals. Pain makes its home somewhere in your body.

    I did not drink, I did not smoke. Never have smoked, and awareness of death did not change that attitude. I drink a glass of wine if I'm eating out and that did not change either.

    Bibliotherapy works for me. I wrote and I read, trying to understand at a deeper level. Two of the better ones were Denial of Death, and The Body Bears the Burden.

    At the beginning I was afraid to want to connect with new friends for about 2 years. Then my practical, engineer side kicked in and I realized the more friends I have the more friends would be alive at any time. I did not stop any activity that I enjoyed fearing it was risky, say diving or rafting.

    Good night.

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  72. Have a carrot, its bigger and healthier.

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  73. Don't buy a cheap one. You'll regret it.

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  74. nah, if it ain't bad for me, it doesn't hit the spot.

    although carrots are delicious, raw that is.

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  75. i won't be the one buying it.

    i'll get a lackey to do it.

    all i purchase are cigarettes and booze. everything else, i get someone to get for me.

    i'll warn them, thanks TNP.

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  76. that sure perked me up. :D

    is it possible for me to do links too? or do i need a blog?

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  77. Check here under the Links section for embedding links

    I personally use " instead of '. I'm not sure if that works just fine, haven't tried.

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  78. I see your logic empath, and also the problem. You're the type that likes to have people you trust and bond with around. That takes time and people die on you. Having more friends means there's always people around but when they grow on you and sometimes die its the same deal once again. Recently I've tried thinking of the people I'm attached to who are getting older as already dead. It's weird and it changes the way I relate to them. So in a way I could relate to a need to connect with something you actually dread and the more detached you are, the deeper the connection.

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  79. thanks TNP.

    'Recently I've tried thinking of the people I'm attached to who are getting older as already dead.'

    wow Gag, interesting thought. it helps the cause when you already wish that they were dead of course.~

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  80. You're most certainly welcome, as always.

    It seems like a good approach, Gag. Sort of, softens the blow.

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  81. notable are you an insomniac?

    i suspect you're 'self-employed' like some of the other socios/anomalies here.

    talking of cats, i have become totally nocturnal.

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  82. No, I have a job. And yes, I am an insomniac.

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  83. that sucks.

    the job i mean.~

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  84. Well, a cold bed versus a warm laptop.

    Such a hard decision.~

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  85. just lie in bed with your warm laptop.~

    you're not actually sitting on a chair at a desk are you?

    that's a true insomniac.

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  86. word of warning,

    don't try this TNP.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wrQUWUfmR_I

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  87. A couch, dear.

    And just who do you think started that rumor in the first place?

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  88. "it's the way empaths blame the sociopath for taking advantage of their empathy that makes me wish i were one. you can't take advantage of empathy. only of a lazy mind."

    Total crock of shit

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  89. Though I wouldn't call it a lazy mind. Perhaps more like a mind preoccupied with stuff that wouldn't make much sense or serve any practical purpose to a sociopath.

    notme:
    Actually it came out of a situation very much as what empath explained in the need for "calm". An irrational dread of dwindling numbers of the few you shared a connection with, sometimes to the point of misguided guilt. As TNP observed, one of the effect is, it does soften certain things including almost reversing the way I would normally react to any perceived mistreatment.

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  90. "Recently I've tried thinking of the people I'm attached to who are getting older as already dead. It's weird and it changes the way I relate to them.'

    This is a strategy that I use all the time. Given I like control and shelter, it's in my best interest to accept the mortality of people. Gag is focusing on the older in that quote but my experience showed me the younger, my ten friends were my age group 16-20. There is no immunity based on age. It is quite possible one of the reasons I like bonding is that I see everyone's inevitable fall very keenly.

    "So in a way I could relate to a need to connect with something you actually dread and the more detached you are, the deeper the connection."
    Zen helps. Always a beginner. I developed a sense of simultaneous passion and indifference in terms of my expectation of people's longevity but I have not yet managed to achieve that in my reaction to other upsetting stimuli. I need practice and repetition, and I thought socios can provide me with and hence my interest in this site. As you've seen earlier I don't react with indifference. I feel too much and also bring emotions out in the open, don't want to do that. I don't really see socios here but because the group is different in terms of age and culture it sure provides very different views that I am bound to find annoying. I need to learn to deal with those the way I deal with death.

    On that note.. I saw someone refer to nonlearning as freedom. That baffled me. To me learning is freedom and that's why I love to learn and also try to teach what I know. But, if that's perceived as reducing someone's freedom even if to one person I'm willing to stop it in a heart-beat and learn to take it on only when requested. Freedom to me is on top of the list of values, way above learning.

    The site is working for me so far. I also learned new terms like sqotd, shove it, hehe... But, I noticed I go far too deeper than most and seem to need to react to everything. That's gonna change. I managed to delay why I'm on this site repetition to this point. I'm used to responding immediately, but that in turn makes me upset when others don't, which is nonsense. I'm busily getting grayer here. And, right after this message I will become mostly ears, very little mouth.

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  91. Anonymous said...
    "it's the way empaths blame the sociopath for taking advantage of their empathy that makes me wish i were one. you can't take advantage of empathy. only of a lazy mind."

    Total crock of shit


    then there is the frightened mind, a whirlwind of opinions and dogma above a deep pool of fear.

    support that snipe with some logic, anonymous. entertain me.

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  92. "It is quite possible one of the reasons I like bonding is that I see everyone's inevitable fall very keenly."

    ..like you want to have the best ringside seat when the shit hits the fan? - Just the image that comes to mind from the words.

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  93. empath said...
    On that note.. I saw someone refer to nonlearning as freedom. That baffled me. To me learning is freedom and that's why I love to learn and also try to teach what I know. But, if that's perceived as reducing someone's freedom even if to one person I'm willing to stop it in a heart-beat and learn to take it on only when requested. Freedom to me is on top of the list of values, way above learning.


    to me, keeping an open mind to new possibilities is freedom and true learning. it's always being a work in progress. it's being a generalist, not a specialist in life, where you exist beyond the day-to-day masks that are required to function in society.

    existing exclusively as a completed product with its various options and features is not just a prison, but a living death. you no longer have the freedom to choose what you say or how you feel, as the thoughts and feelings must serve to keep the product alive. opening the mind could destroy years of hard work.

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  94. GagReflex said...
    "It is quite possible one of the reasons I like bonding is that I see everyone's inevitable fall very keenly."

    ..like you want to have the best ringside seat when the shit hits the fan? - Just the image that comes to mind from the words.


    lol

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  95. empath is a walking oxymoron.

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  96. Emphasis on moron.

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  97. NO ONE, FAILED SUCCESS; YOU'RE THE MAN

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  98. Bird ? Dick? Bird-dick? Funny name, huh?

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  99. You know you love this dick.

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  100. HSPs coming to a sociopath blog for self-counseling...

    Did the rest of the internet kick you out?

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  101. On that note.. I saw someone refer to nonlearning as freedom.

    I believe you are referring to when Zoe said that sometimes it's for one's own benefit to act ignorant, because it makes the other person feel superior, therefore the other person lets down their guard a bit and opens up.

    Also, I assume that Ms Empath's sense of guilt after the deaths she experienced is her feeling bad for being the one to survive, while the other person has died. Perhaps it also involves the issue of who deserves to die more versus who actually does the dying.

    HSPs coming to a sociopath blog for self-counseling...

    Yep, pretty much what I'm seeing. People talking about themselves to themselves, or at least to mirrors of themselves.

    It's not that you are 'deeper', Ms Empath, it's just that you like to publicly analyse yourself more than the rest of us.

    A form of exhibitionism. When you could always write in your diary instead.

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  102. but this diary answers back. what could be better? it's MS empath? that explains the guilt.

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  103. medusa, you get A for effort. i prefer E for the entertainment value

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  104. NotaPath:

    "HSPs coming to a sociopath blog for self-counseling...

    Did the rest of the internet kick you out?"

    Lol.


    Empath,

    As a fellow empath I can usually tell when people are lying.

    ...Can you?


    Aspie and Zoe,

    Yeah, I see it too.
    But it's not the first time I have a feeling that not only M.E. writes the articles. There're several examples from earlier months/years.

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  105. Consistency of character is not a virtue of the sociopath.

    Really, you should know this by now. ;)

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  106. It seems someone has been having fun impersonating me.

    Whoever you are, I'm truly flattered that you would deem my "reputation" here as an anonymous poster is important enough to meddle with.

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  107. @Zhawq

    might be someone else/multiple authors (sociopaths working together? non S-S combo? some sort of S sting?) or maybe he occasionally experiences some S mood that affects his writing/thinging... or it could be deliberate .... maybe he is gauging the effect of it or using it to/for some effect... he can watch/datamine the overall site behavior in terms of traffic flow and the way it effects discussion etc

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  108. that's thinking/affect

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  109. I think there's some overthinking going on here. I don't see anything egregiously weird about ME's recent posts. His interest in his own blog probably wanes in and out like any normal person's.

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  110. You say that like...like... it's a bad thing ;(

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  111. I recall M.E. mentioning something about a 60% rule, so I'd take his choices with a grain of salt.

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