Saturday, December 7, 2013

Beauty of destruction

I thought this went well with the post about what is enticing about cruelty or destroying things. From the Tor Blog:

Do not let Martin Klimas near your grandmother’s china cabinet. The German artist “explores the beauty that comes out of chaos” by using a strobe light and a single camera frame to photograph the moment of impact when a porcelain figure drops. He wants to “explore relationships with time, beauty and destruction,” and apparently also explore the relationship between a dragon and the floor. You can see the entire set here, and check out some of his other work here.


41 comments:

  1. Destruction inspires creation & beauty is found in both.

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    1. Are you by any chance related to superchickflick flick? Do know what happened to Dr.Ginger? tell him come back, don't waste your time looking out there for a blog for Narcissistic people, there is none. This is the closest he can get. Plus, we have a peace treaty now!

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    2. looooooooooooooooooools :)) the flick flick had to go.

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  2. I'm the exact opposite of a sociopath. I HATE to be the source
    of someone's misery. I can count the number of times I was
    responsible for making someone cry on my fingers, and I hated
    every minute of it.
    Once, I wanted to play a game of baseball with my brother's friends.
    I was never much of an alethlete so, one fat kid in particular publically
    ridiculed me. He bumped into me, made fun of me and made the other guys laugh. I went and got my father. He confronted the boy and he began to cry. I was still angry, but my father said, "Enough already! Can't you see he's crying?" I did feel guilty.
    Another time, I was swimming in a neighbour's small above ground
    pool. I played a little trick on a boy and swam between his legs. He
    cried like a baby. Another time, my brother and myself released a sled
    on a gulf couse where people would go sledding in the wintertime and
    the metal part of the sled hit a little girl on skis in the knees. She also
    cried. I felt bad. I also unintentionally hit a girl with an "iceball" she
    also cried and I felt bad. And one time I whipped a coffie can in my
    brother's knee, and he held his knee to his chest and cried for quite a
    while.
    Whenever I felt guilt, there was a physological response, like a wave
    of mortification washing over me. I DON'T think I was taught this.
    I think this was my natural response. Could this be the difference
    between empaths and sociopaths? Could most of it be psycological?
    My mother always believed that a woman's tears turned a man into
    mush. So sometimes she would carefully plan her crying eposides
    to get a response from my father. It always worked.
    Once, I was driving my car on the Long Island Expressway and a
    souped up car loaded with young adults passed me. As it did, one
    of the passengers flung a bolt out the window. Luckily it didn't hit
    me, but glanced inches from my face. If it had struck, I would have
    lost control of the car and dozens could have been killed.

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    1. The level of guilt people have is like water running through a strainer, some people have a big strainer some small, some none at all. The water slowly but surely falls through and your left with no water. Guilt is transient and people move on.

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    2. As posts go, this would certainly win a prize for being the best example of the 'stream of consciousness' writing technique :-)
      I think you'll find that given that sociopathy (or at least its related personality disorder) is a psychological condition, the difference between empaths and sociopaths is entirely psychological.

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    3. i don't like consciously, intentionally, hurting others either. If they hurt me, I might want to get them back,but I don't like it. It's not my natural disposition.
      Been fighting with siblings after our father's death, not fun stuff. Don't like it. Don't want it. Want to get along with them.

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    4. You seem to have learned that in hurting others, you hurt yourself. I'm not saying anyone should feel guilty about hurting others, because that is counter productive and stifles growth. But just recognize how cause and effect works.

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    5. Some people just happen to be super sensitive though, and its hard to always know how they are going to react. So just because I really hurt someone, and they choose to dwell on it, doesn't mean that I have to.

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    6. So then you just say to yourself, I'm sorry, I love you. You are not saying you are sorry to the other person, you are saying it to yourself. Because ultimately it is not about THEM, its about you.

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    7. yeah,ultimately it's always about us and never about them. I'm solely responsible for the quality and direction of my life. that's where our freedom lies regardless of what anyone else says or does.

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    8. well said carlos, cause and effect is something to look at.

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    9. Yes, cause and effect is very important especially when it makes you to lose your flick flick. Don't snap at me, I just had to say it.

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    10. it's ok, not gunna snap, i get it, i had to drop it. it was wordy. you gave me a chuckle. :)

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  3. When you lack the ability to sustain long term the devotion/discipline to create something of beauty, it can be empowering to destroy someone else's product of long term sustained effort. That way the playing field is evil, but you get to think "yeah- but I had fun while they wasted their time..."

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    1. that's an opinion, not a fact.

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    2. machemp is reverting to the dark side this weekend, have fun!

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    3. or perhaps... empathizing with the dark side.
      Doesn't mean I have to join it.

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    4. then why the comment regarding feeling so empowered to destroy someone's long term sustained effort?

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    5. there was no agency attributed- simply an understanding of a certain sort of thinking. It's the only logic I can find for wanton destructiveness. The guy who did the Batman shooting epitomized this perfectly.

      Having been on the receiving end of cruelty, the only way to survive someone like this is to understand that what they are seeking to annihilate/destroy is not you (at least in totality). You are a stand in for the faceless pain they can't name. In vanquishing you and/or rendering your efforts null and void they feel superior instead of inadequate.

      If you meet their rage with your own then they have made you like themselves. If you submit, then you become a meal. Only in seeking to understand your enemy and why what they do makes sense on some level can you locate their humanity. Because when you label them a monster, you're objectfying them, same as they are you.

      Not saying I have this figured out- just trying to wrap my head around this without moralizing. Trying to use logic.

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    6. This makes sense, thanks. I'm trying to understand too They really are in pain aren't they? Your right, we need to seek to understand. I don't hate my friend, I love my friend, but I have to protect myself. it's sad that my friend's in pain and so am I,but I have to move on and live my life,my friend has done that and doesn't seem to be looking back.

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    7. They still have the pain but they have sealed it up so tightly they can't feel it. Your still feeling the pain means you are not less conscious or diminished by the experience. You have gained wisdom. Your "friend" who feels less and has moved on by moving on without looking back is clearly shutting off the ability to learn and grow from knowing you. That is the act of a coward.

      You feel diminished because you think that you are the only one who still cares. But that part of you that hurts, that carries the memory of your friend is still alive. You have lost nothing. You just feel pain.

      Your friend has lost everything that you shared that was good by running "without looking back" . You still have it. You have all the lessons that come from loving an imperfect person and letting yourself be touched and see the beauty they have inside. It hurts. It hurts because you are still alive. You suffer, but whatever love you felt was real.

      I can't explain exactly why you have to hurt, but I can promise you that the pain you feel now is a testament to the fact you let yourself care and that you have not killed off a part of yourself to keep going. All I can tell you is that it won't always hurt so much.

      The pain and the grief- it's blocked love. You love your friend even though they "move on". But love that ends in weeping, not rage is not a bad thing. It makes you wiser and kinder. You'll be ok.

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    8. I'm crying, whoever you are, thank you.

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    9. Time heals the wounds we grieve. The wounds we do not grieve distort our souls. Be gentle with yourself and the pain will pass. What will remain is compassion and appreciation for the one who has wounded you so badly.

      Perhaps your paths will cross again someday and you will see them as they are- limited in their capacity to fully engage because they carry all the pain they can not release.

      Your "need" to have your love returned will be replaced by a capacity to offer a gentle response to whatever degree of engagement they seek. It is possible that they will never seek reconciliation again because they become consumed by their own darkness. That is the true pain of love because you understand that for all the posturing, your friend is simply a terrified child who sees monsters where there are simply people.

      Your pain becomes compassion when you forgive the rage/heartlessness because you see it is only a mask that a terrified and lonely child hides behind. Grief ends if you let it follow this course.

      Wishing you Peace.

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  4. Better to be sadistic. You can take pleasure in the pain that you yourself, or others have gone through (note that all negative experiences are actually memories that have happened at least half a second before this moment). Its actually very beneficial to all if you are able to take pleasure in the suffering that has happend because that suffering is looking for an outlet, and it is irresponsible to continue the suffering by adopting it and deciding that you must feel that way too.

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    1. life is full of pain and pleasure, relish it all!

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  5. really neat pic M.E. love those slow motion pics, fast shutter speed. i love the smashing of land line phones. go through them lots. i have no idea why, but i just need to smash em. something about all the pieces that go flying.

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  6. M.E., I was wondering if you've ever seen Interview starring Steve Buscemi and Sienna Miller. It's about a serious journalist who gets assigned to interview a pop celebrity. At least one of the characters, I believe, is a sociopath, though it's never directly stated in the film. If you've ever seen the movie, would you mind sharing your thoughts?

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  7. * stop action pics i meant, tired tonight.

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    1. You need some ginger bread and lemonade! But apparently, he has given up his stand.
      If he does not show up in three days, I will claim the ownership of his lemonade stand and I will publish 3 "keywords" per day. My words of wisdom should be followed to the letter by everyone in this blog.
      I am not kidding, I have a different style of management.

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    2. lols, cheers. take up a the new lemonade stand. gingerbread wisdom and lemonade freshness for us all. yummies.its ownership command!
      haha i got the giggles. :-))

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  8. I am a sociopath. I have a hard time just throwing things away - I like to take things apart first into pieces. I have done surgery/butchery and studied anatomy. If I killed hookers like Robert Picton, I'd probably disassemble the way he (like pigs) too. I know a pig farmer. watching him take apart an animal, I couldn't help but think, if this guy killed someone, he might take them apart before he knew it.

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    1. Maybe you like taking things apart because you want to see things work under the surface. While butchery and sadism can certainly be connected, the desire to understand the mechanisms that enable a being to live and move doesn't strike me as destructive in and of itself. It strikes me as curious.
      I spent some time with a doctor who grew up in Spain, and would probably be characterized by many as a sociopath. Yet he was really good at what he did and his mastery in his chosen field seemed to provide far more satisfaction than destroying things. That being said, he may've been selectively revealing the parts of himself that he judged to be what I wanted to hear. So I entertain no illusions that the desire to deconstruct is entirely benign.

      But curiosity about deconstructing is different than an urge to destroy purely for destruction's sake. In some ways it is more connected to creation if the information from destruction is used to form a more sophisticated understanding of how things work. Better understanding can lead to more effective actions/remedies is essential to mastery. The real question is: to what end is that mastery ultimately employed?

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    2. Anybody read CRASH by Ballard?
      "A benevolent psychopathology beckons" In the case of CRASH it is the auto accident. Like disaster movies too, there seems to be an inherent satisfaction in disaster and accident, maybe why folks rubber neck, as though the surface of the world has cracked and revealed some hidden truth maybe? The photos are great...giving animation undreamed of in the artists original intent. Remember after the Japan quake and Tsunami? Boats jammed into office blocks and cars in trees, like some mad surrealist had been at work over turning the rules of the world, which may explain the attraction to those of a psycho-pathological leaning..?

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    3. The movie is good.

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  9. You freak me out!

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