Friday, January 22, 2016

Levenson Self-Report Psychopathy Scale

Someone sent me their results from what looks like a personality test on this website: http://personality-testing.info/tests/LSRP.php

My initial thought is this is not going to be legit, but I didn't take it. Has anyone else seen this?

Here's another ethically problematic video re tests: http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/brain-games/videos/are-you-a-psychopath/

Actually, the last link reminds me of my genius reality tv show idea. Let me know if you have contacts. :)



70 comments:

  1. I've taken that test before, but it's not like it will tell me anything I don't already know about myself. It's interesting though to see the comparison to how much higher you score on sociopathic traits than others who have taken it.

    Here's my results:

    "The LSRP measures two scales.

    Scores range from 1 (low) to 5 (high).

    Your score from primary psychopathy has been calculated as 4.7. Primary psychopathy is the affective aspects of psychopathy; a lack of empathy for other people and tolerance for antisocial orientations.

    Your score from secondary psychopathy has been calculated as 3.8. Secondary psychopathy is the antisocial aspects of psychopathy; rule breaking and a lack of effort towards socially rewarded behavior.

    You score for primary psychopathy was higher than 96.43% of people who have taken this test.

    You score for secondary psychopathy was higher than 92.14% of people who have taken this test."

    ESTP Sociopath

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  2. I scored 4.7 on a scale 1 and 3.9 on scale 2. But am i really a psychopath? Sometimes im feeling sad without a cause but on the other side i enjoy antisocial behavior. My emotions are shallow and short-lived. It seems to me as pain is my only real feeling. Im able to control all other feelings easily. But emotional pain makes me mad. I rarely feel empathy, guilt or remorse. Most of the time it doesn't matter to me what i am doing to other people. Sometimes i enjoy hurting someone. But if i try hard i can feel empathy or guilt. But i hate the feeling. It makes you weak. It's funny but i would be proud of beeing a sociopath or psychopath.

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    1. I wouldn't be too concerned about it. The test is simply telling you how high you rate in sociopathic traits and how you compare to others who have taken the test, and simply having said traits doesn't necessarily make you a sociopath. If you are a sociopath? Oh well, you are what you are, and how you cope with that is up to you. If you are a sociopath, odds are prior to the point you became self aware enough of your identity, your sociopathic traits haven't really bothered you too much, and probably still don't as it's rather futile to ruminate upon personality characteristics which will never truly change. It's reasonable to think of the implications of your condition though; having that knowledge now, how can you better yourself as an individual without denying yourself of your true nature?

      Society may want to draw a faint chalk line around you that is made of stereotypes, social stigma, prejudice, and phobia, but you do not have to allow that to dampen your aspirations and dreams of being the unique, powerful, and tough cookie you were born to be. Haters will come in multitudes in your life, and don't let them deter you from living the kind of life you find enriching, fulfilling, and beautiful. Let them be your motivators instead.

      Sociopath or not, may the bridges you burn light the way.

      ESTP Sociopath

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    2. I was always a person which liked the uncommon. The problem was i never really knew who i am. As a kid i have copied other kids and became them. I always felt different and so i wanted to know the reason. To know what it is what makes me different to other people. Thats why i want to know what i am. I feel like having no real personality and thats, boredom or unfilled desires are what causing me a kind of sadness sometimes. If i would know what i am, i could find peace at myself. Then i could understand myself. I can control many things in my brain but that missing knowledge about me is hard to find out or to control in any way. So that's why i wanted to have something to identify with, something giving me safety in my identity.

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    3. I guess I can relate; growing up, my lack of true sense of self identity was glaringly apparent to me, and what accompanied that was a certain kind of emptiness. Finding the right label to apply to yourself only matters so much. It can give you a reason to seek out others troubled by the same issues you face, which has led you here to this blog. Like I have. I find that even though I have established more firmly who I am as an individual, it has little to actually change anything in my life. I'm still the artist with the mirror, always reflecting back to others who gaze into my looking glass what I believe would please them the most. I realized who I was as a person was just a cleverly built shell, and my real inner self just a faint visage of a ghost that I'm only beginning to understand better.

      The label of sociopath doesn't provide any true comfort though. It's just a lense for others aware of it to peer through and judge you with.

      ESTP Sociopath

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    4. And how can i destroy or look trough this shell? If i could i sure wouldn't be sure if i have really seen my true self or if its only another shell... Yeah, i guess it's the same case as yours. Labeling is my kind of searching for my true personality. But i know it would bring me really safety if i would know. Thats why im researching sociopathy/psychopathy and reading this blog. I don't know how to find it out in another way who i am and i don't like to be nothing. How you said, its like i am a ghost. I want to gain safety. I know that would not solve the problem but it would make it better. I know i should not think about these things and accept myself as an individual who is wjo he is but that is not helping me. It doesn't bring light in the case who i am. I am who i am doesn't give me peace. I want to know it more exactly. Do you understand what i mean? And i don't know what i can do about.

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    5. I understand not feeling as if you know who you are. I learned very early to mold myself but still never fit in exceptional with a small circle of people. Due to recent events in my life I too have been searching for answers about myself. I VERY strongly relate to wondering if my depression is a consequence of the inner conflict between what I want and feel versus what I've trained myself to want and feel. I feel like I have a honed exterior with a mid interior that very few people know well and a core that no one knows and am having more trouble keeping at bay. In my case I have one very close friend that has lived this way too, so that has helped. That person understands me more than anyone I've ever known.

      VA Lady

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    6. It's the fear of being a person inside you don't like. The fear of being not that what i think i am. That's the way i feel. I no longer can see if these are really thoughts and feelings of myself or if it only an illusion. I like who i am at the moment but i dont know if thats really me.

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    7. I think it may be our fluidity that is the cause of this. Most people have a more anchored personality, a blessing for us because it makes those people predictable and game-able. But they have a clearly defined identity and self image, whereas mine is dynamic. The Boggart from Harry Potter is analogous to a sociopath in many regards. It is a "real" creature in the books, but nobody knows what it looks like because it instantly depicts something else based on that observer's static personality/thoughts.

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  3. The idea that everyone who enjoys hurting living things is likely to be a sociopath seems predicated on a misunderstanding of human nature. Was everyone who became enthusiastic about lynchings over the past two centuries a sociopath? Is every child who harms an animal also a sociopath? The failure to empathize with a person or creature that is characterized as an other is typical of human beings, isn't it? Why would those traits alone indicate of sociopathy unless we were stooping to popular misuse (sociopathy = general unkindness)?

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  4. Erratum: Why would those traits alone be indicative of sociopathy unless we were stooping to popular misuse of the word (sociopathy = general unkindness)?

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    1. It's the sociopathic personality traits, not necessarily the antisocial behaviors you've outlined, that defines who and who isn't sociopaths. Whether or not the collection of various traits you have adds up to sociopathy? Does it matter? Everyone has some maladaptive personality traits, and what you make of it is up to you.

      ESTP Sociopath

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  5. "If u smoke u die, if u drink u die, if u eat u die, if u love u die..no matter what u die. So do whateva u want homie cuz u gon die anyways." ~ Ellen Degeneres

    ESTP Sociopath

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    1. ESTP-So true!!! Ellen cracks me up!!!

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  6. I've done this test before. Now I scored as follows:

    Primary psychopathy 4.3 (higher than 93.27% of people who have taken the test) and secondary psychopathy as 3.3 (higher than 81.09% of people who have taken the test).

    Since I discovered my sociopathic traits (about 15 months ago) I've actually learned a lot about myself and perhaps even managed to adjust my behavior – the score might have been higher before. It seems that I function better and I certainly feel great about everything. The better I know myself the more I love life. :)



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    1. Self-reflection is helpful to us, isn't it? I also realized this about myself not too long ago. It helps me focus my abilities to better mimic a "normal" person and blend into society.

      Now, I actively think before I speak to avoid offending empaths. I now understand a little better how empaths see the world. Perhaps I don't understand...but I know what triggers them. In my personal relationships and work relationships I can now use this knowledge to my advantage. I'm not offending my superiors as often and can position myself to be more successful professionally.

      -Fellow Sociopath

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    2. My score was 4.1 and 3.8. Did everyone else get that second battery of questions about enjoying hurting people and such?

      Also how the hell do most people score so low on this?

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    3. I didn't do the second set. But I got 3.7 and 3. Not sure how people get such low scores as the graph shows. Must be a bunch of touchy feely types taking the test. Haha.

      -Fellow Sociopath

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    4. My scores were 3.6 & 4.1. I believe my traits may be as much the result of my formative years as anything else.

      VA Lady

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  7. You score for primary psychopathy (2.5) was higher than 64.41% of people who have taken this test.

    You score for secondary psychopathy (3) was higher than 71.45% of people who have taken this test.

    Perhaps Anon is right in that we become hybrids. I'm not ambitious, but I want my community to thrive and I am bold in pushing it forward. I don't damage - and take steps to ensure I don't damage - others around me. But I am more aware that society is a mix of people with varying interests that all play out on a stage.

    I checked INTJForum and sure enough there's a thread. My results are similar to many posters there.

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    1. Hi North!!! I do believe we become "hybrids". It's like the following quotes: Fulton J. Sheen: "We become like that which we love". St. Clare of Assisi: "We become what we love and who we love shapes what we become." Saint Francis de Sales: "Love is the soul’s strongest passion. It is the most powerful motivator. We are shaped by what we love. We become like what we love." Saint Bridget: “We become that which we love.”

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    2. PS-I took the Myers Briggs test, and it has been awhile, but I believe my result was INTJ...

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    3. PSS-It's good to be a "hybrid"!!! Watch the "Underworld" movie series, and you will see-"hybrids" are the strongest!!! I think "hybrids" are often the strongest, regardless of the species.:) I believe that is why they create hybrids so often.:) Gardening comes to mind, and the countless varieties of hybrids they create that are more hardy, than any of the single species they are derived from...

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    4. I like the quotes, thanks for posting them.

      And I like your idea of hardiness. I think one must change in response to such an experience.

      I can't find the words. There is both vastly more and significantly less. There is a kind of swimming or timelessness to experience; yet I am more grounded in my own organism.

      How do you describe the changes?

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    5. I see how our language is crystallisation, a necessary grasping for the purposes of communication.

      What when we cease to label? We see how things might be labelled differently. How understandings are by convention. And how we humans argue incessantly about definitions.

      But we always forget the map is not the territory. We stake out maps (symbols) as if they were land. We're always playing for imaginary sheep stations when to open our hands is to have everything.

      Experience.

      I used to say to him the relationship had no meaning. I think so often we talk about meaning, we are seeking connection. At least I was in that case.

      The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.

      There's a lot to be said for the simple pleasure of spending time in the company of trustworthy people. I want more of this type of experience.

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    6. My heart and mind orbit each other ever more closely but there is still a disjunct, a lack of history or experience. I cannot plot the course, only live it. And this, naturally, takes time.

      Perhaps I am coming to the view Alan Watts holds, that of the universe as a gigantic game, of life as play. Not ever quite so serious, but also not ever quite safe. Like Aslan or Bacchus and his "fierce, madcap girls the Maenads" in C.S. Lewis's Narnia.

      It's a process of lightening up, of experiencing the lack of consequence by embracing whatever outcome arises. Again, in Alan Watts' words - it'll all come out in the wash.

      Alan Watts - Choice

      And it does.

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    7. "You have to regard yourself as a cloud, in the flesh, because you see clouds never make mistakes. Did you ever see a cloud that was misshapen? Did you ever see a badly designed wave? No, they always do the right thing. But if you will treat yourself for a while as a cloud, a wave, you realize you can't make a mistake, whatever you do, because even if you do something that seems totally disastrous, it'll all come out in the wash somehow or other. Then through this capacity you will develop a kind of confidence, and through confidence you will be able to trust your own intuition; of this is the middle way of knowing it has nothing to do with your decision to do this or not, whether you decide you can't make a mistake or whether you don't decide, it's true anyway. That you are like cloud water, and through that realization, without overcompensating in the other direction, you come to the point where you begin to be on good terms with your own being and to be able to trust your own brain."

      Reminds me of my analogy of referring to myself as a tsunami.

      ESTP Sociopath

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    8. I think of myself more as a flower. One that has had the luxury of being in a garden. Cared for and protected. I never really had use for my thorns but they are still mine and they serve a purpose. But that is not all I am.

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    9. I've also been thinking about power. The power others have and the power you have. Its very strange how sociopaths loose so much power after you see past the mask. They become something you can't recognize and that beautiful person is gone just like that. Poof. Then it becomes a power struggle with yourself to deal with what you saw.

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    10. It's a powerful idea, that of reality being perfect and of your being profoundly rooted in it and connected to it.

      "They become something you can't recognize and that beautiful person is gone just like that. Poof. Then it becomes a power struggle with yourself to deal with what you saw."
      A rearrangement of the mind to handle data beyond any previous conception.

      I seek the Middle Way.

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    11. I think I'm always seeking the middle way. Balance. But I tend to be so extreme. What does the middle way mean to you?

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    12. It is a powerful idea. Seeing behind the mask seemed to illuminate a dark spot in me that I think had always been there. It is where something perfect was. Once upon a time.

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    13. I'd describe the Middle Way differently for each situation. To generalise, I find it by letting things settle and then flowing.

      It's shaping without controlling. Knowing better when to let go and let come.

      I'm learning to take care of myself, rather than rushing blindly at anything exciting or difficult or frightening. I'm learning risk management... after I learned to listen to my impulses.

      It's not judging my feelings, or being afraid of them. I'm learning to embrace the alarms they ring sometimes, and to release my mind. In this way, I open it to new experiences and new things.

      I think it's an art that one learns through full immersion in life. A practice, a discipline. Like Hideo:

      The ninja relaxed his pull on the fine, braided string, lowering the bow. He crossed the tiles to where the Remington lay and picked it up. `This is without subtlety,' he said, as if to himself. His voice was cool and pleasant. His every move was part of a dance, a dance that never ended, even when his body was still, at rest, but for all the power it suggested, there was also a humility, an open simplicity.
      ~William Gibson, Neuromancer

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    14. "It is a powerful idea. Seeing behind the mask seemed to illuminate a dark spot in me that I think had always been there. It is where something perfect was. Once upon a time."

      This reads as though you are experiencing a deep commerce with your self.

      I think it's these deep places that are our wellspring. Our mind is like a block universe; timeless, those pathways can be reshaped and can rise phoenix-like.

      I apologise if I extrapolate too much with my own experience.

      I'd love to hear more if you are willing.

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  8. I met with my new mental health therapist today. She wanted me to talk about my family, and that topic gradually came to my brother; I've long suspected my brother to be a sociopath, at least when it comes to antisocial behavior. He had a fascination with cruelty and violence towards animals, specifically domesticated ones. Growing up as a child, I knew nothing different from that, so I figured it was normal sibling behavior. I'd look at the kills like each of them was a art exhibit. I never felt the compulsion to be especially cruel to animals myself, but I found the state of death so beautiful. I didn't dislike my brother any less because this specific kind of behavior, I think that part of our relationship was more of a voyeur admiring the work of an artist.

    Growing up I got to be around all kinds of interesting behavior from my brother, like when he kicked the crutches from beneath someone's arms and kicked at them while laughing maniacally. I wondered to what purpose these kind of behaviors he was acting out had. How, I'd ask myself, was this furthering his ambitions? Was I not appreciating his artwork the right way, not perceiving it from the right angle? Having this knowledge I more or less realized, if me and him are one of the same kind of thing, sociopathy (of course I didn't know to call it that then, I was more or less self aware), he's certainly of much less self control then I am capable of.

    My therapist asked, how did feel being in that kind of family environment? I told her I've always had difficulty identifying and addressing my true emotions, that there has always been shuffling of emotional prioritizing, compartmentalization, the emotions seeping through egocentric and fleeting. So I was apathetic to my situation, molded and adapted to suit my environment. I never knew any different so there was nothing to fear for me, and by the time I was aware of the fact what my childhood was like was not normal it didn't matter to me. In some way I think once I knew that, that there was a difference within myself that set a emotional gap between me and my peers, that I wouldn't wrap my head around there emotional realities no matter how hard I tried to cognitively understand it.

    ESTP Sociopath

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    1. ESTP-If I understand correctly, you previously mentioned that you think you, your brother, and mother are all sociopathic-is that correct? You mentioned your father-do you think he is, as well? Do you have any other siblings, and do you believe, that they are also sociopathic?

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    2. "How, I'd ask myself, was this furthering his ambitions?" I found this comment very interesting. To have ambition you have to have a certain amount of affinity for other people in that the only gain from fulfilling this desire is in their thoughts of you. Having money, or a position of power is only valuable if you find it desirable to be accorded high status by others. If you perceive yourself as different enough from them, then this isn't necessarily of interest. For example, if you were dropped on another planet, would you care about how the aliens saw you? Would it be worth taking the time to learn about and living with the constant irritation of meticulously conforming to their arbitrary standards to obtain a position in their society? I wonder if this is how your brother sees the world. Though I have never had the urges to hurt animals that your brother has, I sometimes feel this way about human society.

      FK

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    3. FK-WONDERFUL ANALOGY!!!

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    4. I have reason to believe my mother is a narcissist. My father, for the amount of time I knew him, displayed sociopathic traits.

      "For example, if you were dropped on another planet, would you care about how the aliens saw you? Would it be worth taking the time to learn about and living with the constant irritation of meticulously conforming to their arbitrary standards to obtain a position in their society?"

      That sounds like my life in general, meticulously adapting to my environment. Perhaps because I lean slightly more towards extroversion, I seek the attention of others to the extent that I want to use others as tools to feed my thirst for stimulation, acquire and maintain the lifestyle that suits me, and having sufficient power to have the freedom I want in life.

      I like your thoughts though. I do relate to them, seeing through the facade of society.

      ESTP Sociopath

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    5. ESTP-Thank you, for your reply.:) I thought I'd share this:

      "Loving ourselves through the process of owning our story is the bravest thing we'll ever do." Brene Brown, PHD.

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    6. ESTP Sociopath: I can often relate to what you write.

      Not related to what I wrote above but I have one sibling and since I got to know myself better (I still don't want to completely self-diagnose myself as a sociopath although I think it's very likely) I've been trying to analyze her too. She definitely has strong traits but is very high functioning. If you met her at a party you would think she is very charming and well-behaving. If you dig deeper you realize she is actually super rational. Likes company more than I do but has never had a problem spending a lot of time by herself. Sometimes I catch her making fun of other people's pets such as 'you think she would die if she fell from the window' and things like that but as soon as she notices that others don't find it funny she sort of corrects herself. She is in a relationship for the first time ever now but it certainly doesn't seem very emotional. More like he fits the role she has for him. I could go on. Oh one thing: me and my sister did a bit of a scam together once and never told anyone. We thought it was hilarious. :D

      Our father is definitely a lot less low functioning but probably has strong traits too. Actually both me and my sister despise his disability to function (he was an alcoholic, acts like an asshole, has lost all his money and health) so much that we have both completely cut him out of our lives. He was diagnosed as bipolar but I believe it's just his lack of self-control: no wonder he got depressed after spending weeks drinking non-stop. He never takes any responsibility for his actions and has never shown any love to us as a family. I don't remember him ever hugging us or stuff like that when we were kids. He is like a reverse role-model for me and my sister.

      Our mother on the other hand is super empathetic – total opposite of my father. She could never ever in million years believe that me or my sis could do anything bad. To her we are just two successful and independent children. :)

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    7. she the pet = a dog :) I on the other hand love most animals. (Although I also love eating them.)

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    8. Oh my your such a baad girl

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  9. Primary: 4.1 (91.63%)
    Secondary: 3.9 (93.62%)

    Not sure if I understand this division. Is it simply thinks like a sociopath (primary) vs. acts like a sociopath (secondary)? Would think that the former would be necessary for the latter, as someone who acted this way without the sociopathic thought patterns would not be considered a sociopath at all. And I would think that the classic "sociopath" is one with high primary, but low secondary traits.

    FK

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    1. My understanding is that it involves nature versus nurture - primary is genetic, secondary is environmental. I can believe this because I score higher on secondary than primary and think that my childhood had a strong influence on creating the strange combination I am today.

      VA Lady

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    2. Can comfirm, a bad childhood does make one more alert

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  10. I do think it has to do more with primary (static personality traits), rather than secondary sociopathy (possible behavior patterns resulting from primary). Antisocial behavior isn't exclusive to sociopathy obviously; anyone can wage psychological warfare, or ruthlessly manipulate their way to a position of power within a group. Sociopaths just have the personality, the proclivities, to be inclined to that kind of behavior, but it doesn't always have to be the case with every situation they're interacting with others. Speaking for myself, if I want to indulge in that kind of behavior there has to be incentive for me. I won't waste my time with individuals or groups that have no value in my eyes, especially if there's no perceived direct benefit with trying to mingle with them. I guess you could call that opportunistic socializing.

    ESTP Sociopath

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  11. I always feel strange when M.E. types smiley faces.

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  12. There was something a friend of mine was getting at when he said,

    "You know, I find it curious how you say you don't waste your time with people who have no utility in your eyes; that girl you stopped from jumping off the balcony, did her life have value in your eyes? What if she tried again? Or your friend who was stabbed to death, if you had been there in time to stop her murderer, what made her valuable enough for that? I think you have a strange way of seeing diamonds where others would see lumps of coal."

    I think what he meant by saying this that of course people are not inherently useful so much as we choose to see a use within them that we then make into reality. Things like that help me remember how I objectify people, that those who would seem so useless to me would be meaningful to me in some way, I just haven't seen it yet.

    ESTP Sociopath

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    1. I would also stop someone jumping of a balcony and i'm actually quite good at stuff like that. It's because I'm a problem solver. Yesterday I was in a supermarket and a lady in front of me dropped some blueberries on the floor. In my mind I saw an image of them bursting when someone steps on them. I offered – and did – pick them up. I didn't do it because I was trying to be good but because there was a problem and I had a solution. I do things like that all the time.

      I've written it here before that I don't quite want to self-diagnose myself as a sociopath but something just happened: a close relative was taken to a hospital for what sounds like a serious reason and I caught myself thinking I wouldn't care if he died. I even like his company but still... I know 'normal' people don't think like this and I would never say this out loud or people would think I'm a monster. I'm not, I just don't feel like most people.

      Something I'm teaching myself to do is actually be more openly 'awful' than I am. What I mean is that I often try to please those I consider valuable. It doesn't always end well. Here is an example: someone in a business situation does something I don't like but I don't tell them I don't like that. It starts to piss me off so much I devaluate that person and do something nasty that has bad consequences to myself or/and I end up burning bridges big time. I could avoid this type of situations by being more direct in the first place. So far it's working quite OK and I'm actually enjoying being honest even if it means someone thinks I'm a bit of an asshole. I would actually be more worried about people who are always 'perfect' than those who have the guts to say out loud things that might upset people. I can only speak for myself but my dark secrets are the ones people should be aware of – not the facade.

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    2. I feel rage is a very real manifestation of manipulation. No matter who the person. Or if it's what one would consider a positive manipulation -like trying to keep someone happy. Asking for what you want and need can be scary. You might not get it. But I find it easier to let things go after I have stated what I want or need.

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    3. You remind me of how I decided to behave around a friend the other day, Lola. I arbitrarly decided to loosen how well my mask of normalcy fitted my face so to speak; I remember she said something petty to me that was obviously her clearly transparent way of trying to emotionally manipulate me, and I said something along the lines of "Oh, good thing I can't empathize with that." Almost immediately after that was said she nearly significantly harmed herself on accident, and I couldn't care less, not a lick of sympathy no matter how much I valued her more than others as a friend, not because what she said prior to the near accident but because I know I don't have that genuine empathy for others. No guilt, no remorse, and she saw that in me in my lack of emotional reaction to what happened. She was quiet for a bit, but it didn't seem to last too long as her own guilt for her own misbehavior kicked in and she forgave me for any wrong doing of mine.

      ESTP Sociopath

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    4. "Asking for what you want and need can be scary. You might not get it. But I find it easier to let things go after I have stated what I want or need."

      Nicely put. This goes for everyone.

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    5. "Only you can truly be held accountable for your own emotions, how you choose to feel about your circumstances, and your self worth."

      I think M.E.'s quote of what I said (was it before I started going by ESTP Sociopath? I can't quite recall) on her Twitter is pretty relevant to me. Perhaps so much of my own composure of my external expression only matters to a certain extent; I have to be willing to trust others to behave in a way that is appropriate for their own well being. They need to be willing to have the right peace of mind to interact with me, to negotiate the kind of relationship they want from me and agree on compromises that suit the both of us.

      I agree with that line of thinking too, North. To assert your desires for the benefit of your well being I think is to be tuning in more to your true nature.

      ESTP Sociopath

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  13. 4.1 for primary;
    3.8 for secondary

    I've taken that test many times and that's usually the outcome, although I know it's worse if I take it when I'm in a bad mood.

    N

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  14. Primary 2.4
    Secondary 1.7

    Do I have the lowest numbers of anyone else here?

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  15. PS-I love M.E.'s tweet: "Only you can truly be held accountable for your own emotions, how you choose to feel about your circumstances, and your self worth." SO TRUE!!! NEVER LET ANYONE ELSE DEFINE YOU!!!

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  16. M.E. Will you take the test, and post your results, for the rest of us??? Also, I think I know what your "genius reality show idea" is.:) I do not have any contacts for you (sorry), but would like to request that those of us here on your blog get "first chance" to be on your reality show, when it comes to fruition!!! I think North and I should DEFINITELY get to be on your reality show, since we are now "hybrids"!!! I know we would add to the "flavor" of the show.:) What do you think, North???

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    1. M.E. What will "the winner/winners" get???

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  17. PS North-We should be on the show together-we "hybrids" need to stick together!!! HA!!! LOL!!!

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    1. PSS North-I think we could "win"!!!

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    2. M.E. What will "the winner/winners" get???

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    3. Me on a reality TV show? I'm not sure the masses are ready for my esoteric ramblings ;)

      Delete
    4. North, You would be marvelous on M.E.'s reality TV show. I don't watch reality TV but if you and few others, Lola, Puppy Basket, HH and ESTP, were contestants, I'd be glued to the screen.

      I love your 'esoteric' ramblings. Keep on trucking and rambling. Please.

      Mr. Hyde

      Delete
    5. Yay, Mr Hyde!

      Glad to see you back!

      We would definitely do well to have your lovely balance.

      Delete
    6. Thank you North, I'm afraid I'm rather camera shy. (That's what living in the bush for 13 years does to most people.)

      But I will sit in the front row of the audience and cheer you and the others on. And happily fetch water when you guys grow thirsty from all that philosophizing. I'll even spring for wine after the show. ;)

      Do you happen to know what reality TV show idea M.E. has? I'm curious.

      Delete
    7. I have no idea!

      M.E. - what's this idea? I do think a good, accessible character study - in whatever format - might achieve some useful objectives.

      Delete
  18. wall of narcissism crits for over 9000 autisms

    ReplyDelete
  19. More people need to be on http://sociopath-community.com/

    !!! it used to be connected to this blog but was disconnected over a year ago. We need fresh blood and lots of interesting things have happened recently that will go down in the forum's history!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Your score from primary psychopathy has been calculated as 2. Primary psychopathy is the affective aspects of psychopathy; a lack of empathy for other people and tolerance for antisocial orientations.

    Your score from secondary psychopathy has been calculated as 1.6. Secondary psychopathy is the antisocial aspects of psychopathy; rule breaking and a lack of effort towards socially rewarded behavior.

    You score for primary psychopathy was higher than 44.84% of people who have taken this test.
    You score for secondary psychopathy was higher than 9.61% of people who have taken this test.

    ReplyDelete

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